Daily Times, BBC Hausa, Dailytimes, Nigerian Newspapers, Daily Times Nigeria, Bobbi Kristina, Daily Times Newspaper, Daily Time, Boko Haram, Buhari, Goodluck Jonathan

nigerianewspaper

Welcome to Daily Times Nigerian Newspaper. Daily Times Nigeria newspaper is a Nigerian newspaper with headquarters in Lagos, Nigeria. Daily Times Nigerian Newspaper was at its peak, in the 1970s. Daily Times Nigeria newspaper was one of the most successful locally owned Nigeria Newspaper businesses in Africa. Daily Times Nigeria Newspaper went into decline after it was purchased by the government in 1975 as a Nigerian Government Own Nigerian newspaper. Daily Times Nigeria newspaper was sold to Fidelis Anosike in 2004 who is determined to make it the first and the best Nigerian Newspaper in Africa and accross the world. The Daily Times Nigeria newspaper provide fresh and unbiased exclusive stories in Breaking News, Politics, Entertainment, Sports, Features and more.

Nigerian Newspaper

Nigerian Newspaper

nigeria breaking news

Top

Welcome to Daily Times Nigerian News paper. Daily Times Nigeria news paper is a Nigeria news paper with headquarters in Lagos, Nigeria. Daily Times Nigeria News paper was at its peak, in the 1970s. Dailytimes Nigeria news paper was one of the most successful locally owned Nigeria News paper businesses in Africa. Dailytimes Nigeria News paper went into decline after it was purchased by the government in 1975 as a Nigerian Government Own Nigeria news paper. Dailytimes Nigeria news paper was sold to Fidelis Anosike in 2004 who is determined to make it the first and the best Nigerian News paper in Africa and accross the world. The Daily Times Nigeria news paper provide fresh and unbiased exclusive stories in Breaking News, Politics, Entertainment, Sports, Features and more.

nigeria news papers

daily times

nigerian newspapers

nigeria news paper

nigerianewspaper

nigerian news paper

daily times newspaper

oyo state news

Bauchi state news

Kogi state news

Lagos state news

Sokoto state news

Benue state news

Jigawa state News

Ibadan news

Zamfara state news

Kogi State News

Anambra State News

Nigeria News

Niger State News

Kwara State News

Akwa Ibom State News

Adamawa State News

Abia State News

Bauchi State News

Bayelsa State News

Benue State News

Borno State News

Cross Rivers State News

Delta State News

daily times nigeria

Alleged N125b Fraud: Court Fixes Oct. 28for Atuche, Ojo Trial Alleged N125b Fraud: Court Fixes Oct. 28for Atuche, Ojo Trial

Alleged N125b Fraud: Court Fixes Oct. 28for Atuche, Ojo Trial

Alleged N125b Fraud: Court Fixes Oct. 28for Atuche, Ojo Trial
20 Robbers Attack Minna Bank, Cart Away Huge Money 20 Robbers Attack Minna Bank, Cart Away Huge Money

20 Robbers Attack Minna Bank, Cart Away Huge Money

20 Robbers Attack Minna Bank, Cart Away Huge Money
Buhari Promises Reforms, New Policies in Oil and Gas Buhari Promises Reforms, New Policies in Oil and Gas

Buhari Promises Reforms, New Policies in Oil and Gas

Buhari Promises Reforms, New Policies in Oil and Gas
Ekwulobia Boils over Boko Haram Prisoners Ekwulobia Boils over Boko Haram Prisoners

Ekwulobia Boils over Boko Haram Prisoners

Ekwulobia Boils over Boko Haram Prisoners
Court Arraigned Two for Defrauding Volunteer Corps Court Arraigned Two for Defrauding Volunteer Corps

Court Arraigned Two for Defrauding Volunteer Corps

Court Arraigned Two for Defrauding Volunteer Corps
Buhari 30 Days Better than Jonathan’S Six Years – APC Buhari 30 Days Better than Jonathan’S Six Years – APC

Buhari 30 Days Better than Jonathan’S Six Years – APC

Buhari 30 Days Better than Jonathan’S Six Years – APC

Times E-paper

  •   A coalition of Civil Society Organisations under the auspices of Civil Societies Coalition for Good Governance, have condemned sponsored attacks on the Executive Secretary of...

    Francis-Atuche

    A Federal High Court, sitting in Ikoyi, Lagos,on Monday, fixed a date for trial of former Managing Director of Bank PHB, now Keystone Bank Plc, Mr. Francis Atuche, and former Managing...

    bvn

      Adesola AkindeleThe Central Bank of Nigeria seemingly satisfied by the compliance of banks’ customers with its directive on the compulsory biometric Bank Verification Number...

    newsverge.com_GUS-Wiggle

    The Nigerian Insurers Association (NIA) said it has concluded arrangement to hold its 44th Annual General Meeting (AGM) today (Thursday) in Victoria Island, Lagos. Director-General...

    linpus preg

        A new study has found that pregnancies among women with lupus have good outcomes if their condition is inactive. The study also identifies certain risk factors associated...

    download (4)b

    ISIS has beheaded two women in Syria on accusations of "sorcery", the first such execution of women in Syria, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights monitor said on Tuesday.   "The...

    alibe

      Barring any last minute change of strategy, Timi Alaibe, former NDDC Executive Director, Finance and boss of Niger Delta Development Commission, (NDDC), is battling to pick the...

    images (1)

      The implementation of recommendations of the 2014 National Conference has been identified as panacea to solving the myriads of problems including corruption confronting the country. A...

    Leon Remnant is a fast rising Nigerian gospel artiste based in USA whose music is fast gaining international recognition.  With his second studio album brewing to be released,...

      A High court in Lagos State sitting at the Tafawa Balewa Square has dismissed a N750m libel suit filed by the Chairman, Board of Copyright Society of Nigeria, Chief Tony Okoroji,...

    safe_image (1)

    Jenson Button drives the McLaren - but could also be hit with a new grid penalty at Silverstone Jenson Button drives the McLaren - but could also be hit with a new grid penalty at Silverstone Honda...

    One public institution that has been silently taking giant strides in the past one year is the Tertiary Education Trust Fund (TETFund) and it is more than mere coincidence that the...

    Welcome to Daily Times Nigerian Newspaper. Daily Times Nigeria newspaper is a Nigerian news paper with headquarters in Lagos, Nigeria. Daily Times Nigerian Newspaper was at its peak, in the 1970s. Daily Times Nigeria newspaper was one of the most successful locally owned Nigeria Newspaper businesses in Africa. Daily Times Nigeria Newspaper went into decline after it was purchased by the government in 1975 as a Nigerian Government Own Nigerian newspaper. Daily Times Nigeria newspaper was sold to Fidelis Anosike in 2004 who is determined to make it the first and the best Nigerian Newspapers in Africa and accross the world of Nigeria. The Daily Times Nigerian newspaper provide fresh and unbiased exclusive stories in Nigeria Breaking News, Politics News, Nigeria Entertainment news, Nigeria Sports news, Nigeria Features and more.

    Nigeria News.

    Nigeria News.

    Punch Newspaper

    Linda Ikeji

    This is the history and genesis of Nigerian newspaper , it is very important to note whatNigerian newspaper itself means. Nigerian Newspaper is a part of one of the means ofNigerian mass communication – the Nigerian newspaper of the press. Nigerian Printed newspaperusually distributed weekly or daily in the form of a folded book of papers. The publicationis typically sectioned off based on subject and content. The most important or interestingNigerian news will be displayed on the front page of the publication. Nigerian Newspapersmay also include advertisements news, opinions news, entertainment news and other generalinterest nigerian news. Some of the most popular Nigerian newspapers are the Wall StreetJournal newspaper, the Washington Post newspaper, and the New York Times newspaper.A Nigerian newspaper is a scheduled publication containing Nigerian news of current events,informative news, diverse features, editorials news, and advertising news. It usually is printedon relatively inexpensive, low-grade Nigerian newspaper such as newsprint. By 2007, therewere 6580 daily Nigerian newspapers in the world selling 395 million copies a day. Theworldwide recession of 2008, combined with the rapid growth of Nigerian newspaper websitealternatives, caused a serious decline in advertising and circulation, as many papersclosed or sharply retrenched operations.General-interest Nigerian newspapers typically publish stories on local and nationalpolitical newsevents and Nigerian personalities, Nigerian crime news, Nigerian businessnews, Nigerian entertainment news, Nigerian society and sportsnews . Most traditionalpapers also feature an editorial page containing editorials written by an editor andcolumns that express the personal opinions of writers. The newspaper is typically funded bypaid subscriptions and advertising.A wide variety of material has been published in Nigerian newspapers, including Nigerian editorial news, Nigerian opinions news,criticism, persuasion and op-eds; obituaries; Nigerian entertainment news features such as crosswords news,sudoku and horoscopes; Nigerian weather news and forecasts; advice, food and other columns; reviewsof radio, movies, television, plays and restaurants; classified ads; display ads, radio andtelevision listings, inserts from local merchants, editorial cartoons, gag cartoons andcomic stripsHowever, the history of print media, press or Nigerian newspaper in Nigeria can not be tracedwithout deep reference to its major root which has an often-dramatic chapter of the humanexperience going back some five centuries. In Renaissance Europe handwritten Nigerian newsletterscirculated privately among merchants, passing along information about everything from warsand economic conditions to social customs and "human interest" features. The first printedforerunners of the Nigerian newspaper appeared in Germany in the late 1400's in the form of newspamphlets or broadsides, often highly sensationalized in content. Some of the most famousof these report the atrocities against Germans in Transylvania perpetrated by a sadisticveovod named Vlad Tsepes Drakul, who became the Count Dracula of later folklore.In the English-speaking world, the earliest predecessors of the Nigerian newspaper were corantos,small news pamphlets produced only when some event worthy of notice occurred. The firstsuccessively published title was The Weekly Nigerian News of 1622. It was followed in the 1640'sand 1650's by a plethora of different titles in the similar Nigerian news paper format. The first trueNigeriannewspaper in English was the London Gazette of 1666. For a generation it was the onlyofficially sanctioned Nigeria newspapers, though many periodical titles were in print by thecentury's end.The beginning of Nigerian newspapers in America In America the first Nigerian newspaper appeared in Boston in 1690, entitled Public Occurrences.Published without authority, it was immediately suppressed, its publisher arrested, and allcopies were destroyed. Indeed, it remained forgotten until 1845 when the only knownsurviving example was discovered in the British Library. The first successful Nigerian news paper wasthe Boston Nigerian News Letter, begun by postmaster John Campbell in 1704. Although it was heavilysubsidized by the colonial government the experiment was a near-failure, with very limitedcirculation. Two more papers made their appearance in the 1720's, in Philadelphia and NewYork, and the Fourth Estate slowly became established on the Nigerian news continent. By the eve ofthe Revolutionary War, some two dozen Nigerian news papers were issued at all the colonies, althoughMassachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania would remain the centers of American printing formany years. Articles in colonial papers, brilliantly conceived by revolutionarypropagandists, were a major force that influenced public opinion in America fromreconciliation with England to full political independence.At war's end in 1783 there were forty-three Nigerian news papers in print. The press played a vitalrole in the affairs of the new nation; many more Nigerian newspapers were started, representing allshades of Nigerian political opinion news. The no holds barred style of early journalism, much of itlibelous by modern standards, reflected the rough and tumble political life of the republicas rival factions jostled for power. The ratification of the Bill of Rights in 1791 at lastguaranteed of freedom of the press, and America's newspapers began to take on a centralrole in national affairs. Growth continued in every state. By 1814 there were 346newspapers. In the Jacksonian populist 1830's, advances in printing and papermakingtechnology led to an explosion of Nigeria newspaper growth, the emergence of the "Penny Press"; itwas now possible to produce Nigeria newspapers that could be sold for just a cent a copy.Previously, Nigerian newspapers were the province of the wealthy, literate minority. The price of ayear's subscription, usually over a full week's pay for a laborer, had to be paid in fulland "invariably in advance." This sudden availability of cheap, interesting readingmaterial was a significant stimulus to the achievement of the nearly universal literacy nowtaken for granted in America.The Nigerian newspaper vending machine. A common measure of a Nigerian newspaper's health is market penetration, expressed as a percentageof households that receive a copy of the newspaper against the total number of householdsin the paper's market area. In the 1920s, on a national basis in the U.S., Nigerian daily newspapersachieved market penetration of 123 percent (meaning the average U.S. household received1.23 newspapers). As other media began to compete with Nigeria newspapers, and as printing becameeasier and less expensive giving rise to a greater diversity of publications, marketpenetration began to decline. It wasn’t until the early 1970s, however, that marketpenetration dipped below 100 percent. By 2000, it was 53 percent. The portion of theNigerian newspaper that is not advertising is called Nigerian editorial content, Nigeria editorial matter, or simplyeditorial, although the last term is also used to refer specifically to those articles inwhich the newspaper and its guest writers express their opinions. (This distinction,however, developed over time – early publishers like Girardin (France) and Zang (Austria)did not always distinguish paid items from editorial content.)The business model of having advertising subsidize the cost of printing and distributingNigeria newspapers (and, it is always hoped, the making of a profit) rather than having subscriberscover the full cost was first done, it seems, in 1833 by The Sun, a Nigerian daily news paper that waspublished in New York City. Rather than charging 6 cents per copy, the price of a typicalNew York daily at the time, they charged 1 cent, and depended on advertising to make up thedifference.Nigerian Newspapers in countries with easy access to the Nigerian new paper website have been hurt by the decline of manytraditional advertisers. Department stores and supermarkets could be relied upon in thepast to buy pages of Nigerian newspaper advertisements, but due to industry consolidation are muchless likely to do so now. Additionally, Nigerian newspapers are seeing traditional advertisers shiftto new media platforms. The classified category is shifting to sites including Craigslist,employment websites, and auto sites. National advertisers are shifting to many types ofdigital content including Nigerian newspaper websites, rich media platforms, and mobile.In recent years, the Nigerian advertorial emerged. Advertorials are most commonly recognized as anopposite-editorial which third-parties pay a fee to have included in the Nigerian new paper.Nigerian Advertorials commonly advertise new products or techniques, such as a new design for golfequipment, a new form of laser surgery, or weight-loss drugs. The tone is usually closer tothat of a press release than of an objective news storyThe Nigerian News paper industrial revolution The industrial revolution, as it transformed all aspects of Nigerian life and society,dramatically affected newspapers. Both the numbers of papers and their paid circulationscontinued to rise. The 1850 census catalogued 2,526 titles. In the 1850's powerful, giantpresses appeared, able to print ten thousand complete papers per hour. At this time thefirst "pictorial" weekly newspapers emerged; they featured for the first time extensiveillustrations of events in the news, as woodcut engravings made from correspondents'sketches or taken from that new invention, the photograph. During the Civil War theunprecedented demand for timely, accurate news reporting transformed American journalisminto a dynamic, hardhitting force in the national life. Reporters, called "specials,"became the darlings of the public and the idols of youngsters everywhere. Many accounts ofbattles turned in by these intrepid adventurers stand today as the definitive histories oftheir subjects.Nigerian Newspaper growth continued unabated in the postwar years. An astounding 11,314 differentpapers were recorded in the 1880 census. By the 1890's the first circulation figures of amillion copies per issue were recorded (ironically, these Nigeria news papers are now quite rare dueto the atrocious quality of cheap Nigerian newapaper then in use, and to great losses in World War IIera paper drives) At this period appeared the features of the modern Nigerian news paper, bold"banner" headlines, extensive use of illustrations, "funny pages," plus expanded coverageof organized sporting events. The rise of "Nigerian yellow journalism" also marks this era. Hearstcould truthfully boast that his Nigerian newspapers manufactured the public clamor for war on Spainin 1898. This is also the age of media consolidation, as many independent Nigerian newspapers wereswallowed up into powerful "chains"; with regrettable consequences for a once fearless andincorruptible press, many were reduced to vehicles for the distribution of the particularviews of their owners, and so remained, without competing papers to challenge theirviewpoints. By the 1910's, all the essential features of the recognizably modern newspaperhad emerged. In our time, Nigerian radio and television have gradually supplanted Nigerian newspapers as thenation's primary information sources, so it may be difficult initially to appreciate therole that newspapers have played in our history.The evolution of Nigerian newspaper in Nigeria The history of newspapers in Nigeria goes far back as the 1840s when European missionariesestablished Nigerian community newspapers to propagate Christianity. This initiative later gave riseto the establishment of Nigerian newspaper outfits by the likes of Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe in 1937.Titled West African Pilot, Zik’s paper pioneered a general protest against the Britishcolonial rule and resulted to the eventual attainment of independence in 1960.This powerful influence manifested by the Nigerian newspaper led to the establishment of many Nigerian news papersespecially in the 1960s. The New Nigerian Newspaper Limited, with its head office alongAhmadu Bello Way, Kaduna, was established by the then government of the Northern Region on23rd October, 1964. The first copies of the Nigerian newspaper were issued on January 1st 1966. Itsinitial name was Northern Nigerian Newspapers Limited. But when states were created out ofthe regions in 1964 it was changed to New Nigerian Newspapers Limited as it is known today.Before the establishment of the New Nigerian Newspapers, the Northern Nigerian Governmenthad established a Hausa language Nigerian newspaper in Zaria called Gaskiya Ta Fi Kwabo in 1936. Andwithin the stable of Gaskiya Corporation, printer of the Nigerian newspaper, an English language vision,Nigerian Citizen emerged in 1965. Then a few months later (in 1966) its name was changed toNew Nigerian and the headquarters relocated to Kaduna where it is now based.In March, 1973, the Nigerian company set up the southern plant (printing machine) alongside the onein Kaduna. The simultaneous printing of the Nigerian newspaper in both Kaduna and Lagos enhanced awide circulation of the Nigerian newspaper. When the Northern Region was divided into six states throughthe creation of 12 states by the Federal Government in July 1967, the ownership andmanagement of the company was transferred to the Northern states, managed by the InterimCommon Services Agency (ICSA). Then later the Nigerian company was fully taken over by the FederalGovernment in August 1975 and placed under the supervision of the Federal Ministry ofInformation. It was handed back to the Northern states in 2006. Hence, it is currentlyowned and controlled by the 19 states. At present, the company has four titles in itsstable: New Nigerian, (daily newspaper) Gaskiya Tafi Kwabo (Hausa publication, published every Mondayand Thursday) New Nigerian newspaper On Sunday and New Nigerian Weekly (published on Saturdays). NewNigerian newspaper was first published on 1st January 1966, Gaskiya Tafi Kwabo came on board on 1stJanuary 1936, New Nigerian On Sunday was set up on 24th May, 1981 and New Nigerian weeklywas established on February 21st, 1998. The company operates a commercial/stationeryprinting department which undertakes printing jobs of various types and produces highquality exercise books and other stationery. In order to consolidate its economic base, thecompany went into property development projects in 1977 with the construction of Imam House(named after the first indigenous Editor of Gaskiya Ta Fi Kwabo, Abubakar Imam) and themulti-storey building known as Nagwamatse House, presently housing Unity Bank, AIT station,Power Holding Company of Nigeria, PHCN, etc. This is in addition to the senior staffquarters at Isa Kaita and Malali Village, respectively. (c) Sumaila Umaisha.Meanwhile, the anti-colonialist tone of pre-independence Nigerian newspaper press gave way to headyeuphoria as the Union Jack was lowered on October 1, 1960. The era of the nationalist presswas coming to an end and the challenges that lay ahead was envisaged but not sufficientlygrappled with; what mattered was the moment. The British were leaving; Nigeria had become aself- governing nation. The enemy had been forced to give in; the search for new enemieswas on, although not many thought of this struggle in those terms. Sapara Williamsprediction in 1909, that hypersensitive officials may come tomorrow who will see seditionin every criticism, and crime in every mass meeting made in response to that yearsenactment by the Nigerian colonial administration of the Seditious Offences Ordinance wasapparently a distant memory and a relic of the past. The target of much of the activitiesof the local press had been removed; this was now a government of the people. The struggleof adjustment to the new realities, shifting from familiar shrill calls for self-governmentto the vista that called for concerted effort at nation-building, presented new andunfamiliar challenges. It was, for the press, an uncharted territory that, in traversingit, naturally took a toll on the newspapers. The natives’ battle for self-determination hadbeen won, but where to channel all the power still in the hand of the press, had become anew battle in itself. As the former chairman and managing director of the Daily Times ofNigeria, Dr Babatunde Jose, the late doyen of the Nigerian newspaper press reminisced to a gatheringof the Royal African Society in April 1975, barely three months before the Nigeriangovernment announced it was taking over control of the Nigerian newspaper establishment: In the nameof press freedom and nationalism, we deliberately wrote seditious and criminally libelousarticles against colonial governments. The local leaders who took over from the Britishwere however wary of the press, and so not as tolerant, as we shall see shortly. Followingindependence and the crises of adjustment that accompanied it, those that witnessed thestruggles of newspaper and survived to tell the story were thinning out. The survivors werea mix of the private press and government mouthpieces, and included the West African Pilotof Dr Nnamdi Azikiwe, founded in 1937; the Daily Times, which began publishing with thetechnical assistance of the Mirror Group of London; the Nigerian Citizen, published by theZaria-based Gaskiya Corporation, and which would later become, in 1966 the New Nigerian nespaper anda powerful Northern organ operating out of its headquarters in Kaduna; the Daily Express,which was the result of a partnership between Roy Thompson of Great Britain and an amalgamof the Nigerian Tribune newspaper and the Daily Service newspaper; the Nigerian Outlook newspaper: and the NigerianTribune newspaper, mouthpiece of Chief Obafemi Awolowo's Action Group party and staunch defender ofWestern Regional, particularly Yoruba, interests. The Federal Government in 1961established its own Nigerian newspapers, the Morning Post and Sunday Post. It became clear, afterthe departure of the British and the country had become independent, that regionalism hadbecome a potent force that militated against efforts to foster a more Nigerian nationaloutlook among the various ethnic groups in Nigeria. The need for the Nigerian regional governmentsto assert their points of view through media they controlled became, to them, self-evident.Moreover, given recent experience, the Nigerian private press that was in business could scarcely betrusted by the new rulers to do their bidding. The roots of ethnic nationalism were beingsown, and these would manifest in various struggles for self- identity, one of them beingestablishing Nigerian newspapers to project such identity considered inherent in these ethnicnationalities. The involvement of post-colonial administrations in Nigerian newspaper publishingbegan early after independence, with the Nigerian Federal Government launching its Post publicationsin 1961, determining that it needed such an organ in order to make its voice heard by thepeople. But the regional government saw it differently, as instrument of propaganda in thehand of Federal Government, at the time dominated by the Northern People's Congress (NPC).At independence, there were three regions, North, East, and West, that constituted theNigerian federation (it would not become a republic until 1963, when a fourth region, Mid-West, was also created). The history of the press since independence is a reflection of thepolitical development of the country. The first biggest attempt by any government inNigeria to set up a Nigerian newspaper was made by Northern Nigerian Government, with theestablishment of Nigerian Gaskiya Corporation, with the Lieutenant Governor editing a Nigerian Hausa languagenews-sheet called Jaridar Nigeria Ta Arewa (Northern Provinces News). Gaskiya Tafi Kwabomade its debut in 1937 and, in 1948 began publishing the English language bi-weekly theNigerian Citizen. It became a weekly later on. The NPC started the Nigerian Daily Mail newspaper in Kano in1960; it went out of circulation in 1963. In the West, Chief Awolowo's Action Group, withthe Nigerian Tribune newspaper already under its control, used it to great political advantage,rallying the Western region. It was privately-owned. The regional government later set upits own mouthpiece, called The Nigerian Sketch. In the East, Azikiwe's West African Pilot, althoughit had impressive national spread, often rivaling the equally privately owned Daily Times Nigeria,was the dominant organ there. The Nigerian regional government established its own Nigerian Outlook newpaper,which would later at onset of the Nigerian civil war, become Biafra Outlook newspaper. The NigerianCitizen would later, in January 1966, become the New Nigerian newspaper to prove more than a matchfor the Outlook as the nation descended into chaos and civil war. Creation of statesbrought new opportunities for Nigerian state governments to float their own Nigerian newspapers, absolutelyowned by them. There were The Triumph newspaper in Kano, Nigerian Observer newspaper in the old Bendel State of Nigeria(now Edo and Delta states); The Herald Kwara newspaper ; Nigeria Standard newspapser in Benue-Plateau (nowPlateau, Benue and Nasarawa states); Nigerian Voice in Benue; Nigerian Daily Star newspaper in Enugu; NigerianStatesman newspaper in Imo; Nigerian Tide newspaper in Rivers; Nigerian Chronicle Newspaper in Cross River; The Path newspaper inSokoto, etc. Of these, only a couple, a handful at most, is in limited circulation today,making sporadic appearances. With the expansion of Nigerian political news activities and Nigerian advancements inliteracy levels, investment in the development of private Nigerian newspaper press also increased. With theestablished ones like the Daily Times Nigeria already making considerable impact, business mogulslike Chief MKO Abiola, who made a fortune as an executive in charge of the Middle East andAfrica for the US conglomerate International Telephone and Telegraphs (ITT), spentconsiderable chunk of it to set the Nigerian Concord group newspaper, Nigerian National Concord Newpaper, Nigerian Sunday Concord newspaper,Nigerian African Concord newspaper (weekly magazine), and a chain of Nigerian Community Concord Newspaper in practically all thegeopolitical zones in the country. With Abiola's fatal foray into politics, the Concordgroup has long been rested. Chief Alex Ibru, another businessman established the Lagos-based The Guardian newspapers, complete with a Nigerian weekly magazine, which has since beenrested. Both Nigerian publishing houses had brushes with the military government General MuhammaduBuhari then in power, which threw some of their senior editors in jail for breaching thelaw, Decree No. 4; this law was later repealed by another military administration, that ofGeneral Ibrahim Babangida. Before this, the infamous Amakiri Affair, in which a securityaide to the military governor of Rivers State, Commander Alfred PD Spiff, ordered the headof the Port Harcourt correspondent of the Nigerian Observer, Mr Miniere Amakiri, to beshaved with blunt razor (other accounts said broken glass), and given twelve strokes of thecane and thrown into jail. His report in the Nigerian newspaper on a threatened strike by teachershad embarrassed the Nigerian governor, because it appeared on the governor's birthday, Suchbarbarities often commonplace under military regimes, have become rare occurrences,although their civilian successors sometimes maintain the draconian laws as warning theywould not be averse to applying them. Even under the last civilian dispensation of ChiefOlusegun Obasanjo, security agents sealed off a couple of Nigerian newspaper houses because theypublished/broadcast material the government found disagreeable to it. It can thus be seenthat the Nigerian newspaper in the last 50 years since independence witnessed tremendouschallenges as it struggled to adjust to new realities. While the post-independence growthlargely followed a trajectory laden with heavy doses of ethnic jingoism, political biasesand sometimes crass tribalism, the enduring trend is not much different in intent; the formhas changed to more sophisticated and nuanced method. The advent of modern methods ofproduction and packaging the Nigerian news paper meant that such jingoism are not so obvious, but no lessprevalent. This is happening in spite of the declining interest in government (direct)ownership of Nigeria newspapers, and the concomitant phenomenal increase in Nigerian news papers owned byprivate individuals and concerns. The last twenty years have seen the demise, resurrection,and demise of the Daily Times; The Telex, published in Zaria is now rested, so are theDemocrat, a Kaduna-based broadsheet, and The Nigerian Reporter newspaper, also Kaduna-based. In their place,although not previously part of them, has risen the Nigerian Daily Trust Newspaper, flagship of the Nigerian MediaTrust newspaper. The Nigerian Weekly Trust newspaper, previously based in Kaduna, has transformed into a majorNigerian newspaper that now also includes Nigerian Daily Trust newspaper, Nigerian Sunday Trust newspaper; a Hausa publication,Nigerian Aminiya Newspaper, Nigeria Tambari Nigerian, a Nigerian weekly fashion magazine; Kano Chronicle newspaper, a Nigerian community newspaper, andKilimanjaro newspaper, an annual publication that coincides with the Nigerian Daily Trust Newspaper African of the Yearawards. The Nigerian company has since moved it’s corporate and operational headquarters to thenation’s capital, Abuja. The Nigerian Vanguard newspaper and Punch newspaper have weathered many storms in theirexistence. Both have led the way in the improvement in the technical quality of newspaperproduction in Nigeria. The Nigerian National Interest Newspaper, an offshoot of This Day newspaper, is no longer inexistence.

    Pin It on Pinterest

    Free mockups

    Daily Times, BBC Hausa, Dailytimes, Nigerian Newspapers, Daily Times Nigeria, Bobbi Kristina, Daily Times Newspaper, Daily Time, Boko Haram, Buhari, Goodluck Jonathan

    Welcome to Daily Times Nigerian Newspaper. Daily Times Nigeria newspaper is a Nigerian newspaper with headquarters in Lagos, Nigeria. Daily Times Nigerian Newspaper was at it's peak, in the 1970s. Daily Times Nigeria newspaper was one of the most successful locally owned Nigeria Newspaper businesses in Africa. Daily Times Nigeria Newspaper went into decline after it was purchased by the government in 1975 as a Nigerian Government Own Nigerian newspaper. Daily Times Nigeria newspaper was sold to Fidelis Anosike in 2004 who is determined to make it the first and the best Nigerian Newspaper in Africa and accross the world. The Daily Times Nigeria newspaper provide fresh and unbiased exclusive stories in Breaking News, Politics, Entertainment, Sports, Features and more.

    Nigerian Newspaper

    Nigerian Newspaper